latest news

DISCOUNTS

NUTRITION TIPS

Which is better: sports drinks or water during a competitive event or training?

If the duration of the activity for an individual athlete is fairly continuous for 1 hour or longer, a sports drink is the better replacement fluid. However, if the activity lasts less than 1 hour, water is the best option. In either case, an athlete should have about 6-8 ounces of fluid replacement every 30 minutes during strenuous, continuous activity.

STAFF INFECTION

SHIN GUARD RASHES

PREVENTION:

Wear thin stockings underneath the shin guards. Wash the shin guards often. Use GTECH SPORT SPRAY to inhibit the growth of bacterial odors and germs.

GTECH Sport Antimicrobial Spray

Got sweaty smelly soccer shin guards and shoes? Use GTECH Sport Spray to freshen all of your sports gear, apparel, and shoes. It's simple, safe to use, and skin friendly. Use COUPON CODE "LAX" and SAVE 10% on your online order at www.gtechsport.com

Sell GTECH and raise $5,000, $10,000... for your team or club. Click the "FUNDRAISING" tab above for more information. Contact Coach Quang Hamon at quang@gtechsport.com when you are ready to sign up and start making money!!!


Spring Break Summer Camp

 3 Day Camp (Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday)

Prepare for Mustang Division 3 Tryouts. Get 3 Days of Tryout Trainings (1 v 1s, 2 v 2s, small sided games, etc...) 

IMPROVE SOCCER SKILLS THROUGH FUN GAMES, NOT BORING DRILLS. 9 hours of our camp is equivalent to 1.5 months of soccer practice/training.

GAMES: Monkey Tails, Dungeon Hero, Finding Nemo, Ice Monster, Doctor Doctor, World Cup Cuppies, Terminator, Snake Pit, Chain Tag and more…

 

● Positive environment for kids fun

● Games requires players to engage in friendly competition

● Learn technical soccer skills while having fun

 

DATES:      April 14-16 (Mon-Wed) at MTV Artificial Turf Field/Diablo Vista Snake Park (1000 Tassjara Drive, Danville)

TIMES:          9 am to 12 pm each day

COST:        $125.00 (siblings receive a $20 discount)

LUNCH:     Pizza & Garlic Bread is served each day at no additional cost

PRIZES:        Every child will earn Bulldog Tickets/Dollars every day. Players can use tickets/dollars to buy toys, soccer pictures, candy, and more... On the last day of camp we will hold an auction and players can make bids on VIDEO GAMES, soccer balls, and soccer socks.

DROP-IN:      Okay

 

 

Bulldog Soccer 4 Day

Summer Camps

DATES:       July 22-25 from 9 am to 12 pm (DVMS, 4100 Camino Tassajara Rd, Danville)

                      July 28-31 from 9 am to 12 pm (DVMS, 4100 Camino Tassajara Rd, Danville)

                      August 4-7 from 9 am to 12 pm (DVMS, 4100 Camino Tassajara Rd, Danville)

                      August 12-15 from 9 am to 12 pm (DVMS, 4100 Camino Tassajara Rd, Danville)

                      August 18-21 from 9 am to 12 pm (DVMS, 4100 Camino Tassajara Rd, Danville)

 

TIMES:          9 am to 12 pm each day

COST:        $150.00 (siblings receive a $20 discount)

LUNCH:     Pizza & Garlic Bread is served each day at no additional cost

PRIZES:        Every child will earn Bulldog Tickets/Dollars every day. Players can use tickets/dollars to buy toys, soccer pictures, candy, and more... On the last day of camp we will hold an auction and players can make bids on VIDEO GAMES, soccer balls, and soccer socks.

DROP-IN:      Okay

ELITE STRIKER HALL OF FAME

ELITE STRIKERS HALL OF FAME

FYI

80 mph Cristiano Ronaldo (plays for Real Madrid)

70-80 mph Average kick for Professional & College Male Soccer Players

55-65 mph Average kick for Professional & College Female Soccer Players

Bulldog Soccer Trained Strikers

Right Foot Milestones

35 Club (must be under 6 years old)

35 mph Tad D. (achieved in 2013 at age 5 ½, plays for Walnut Creek)

40 Club (must be under 9 years old)

40 mph Brooke B. (achieved in 2012 at age 8, plays for Mustang)

40 mph CoCo W. (achieved in 2012 at age 8, plays for Mustang)

40 mph Ethan H. (achieved in 2012 at age 7, plays for Mustang)

40 mph Kyhlie W. (achieved in 2010 at age 8, plays for San Ramon)

42 mph Delaney S. (achieved in 2009 at age 8, plays for Pleasanton Rage)

42 mph Paige M. (achieved in 2013 at age 8, plays for Pleasanton Rage)

42 mph Alana O. (achieved in 2013 at age 8, plays for Pleasanton Rage)

43 mph Kailey K. (achieved in 2013 at age 8, plays for San Ramon)

45 mph Kylee H. (achieved in 2005 at age 8, plays for Mustang)

50 Club

50 mph Liam c. (achieved in 2013 at age 10, plays for Mustang)

50 mph Brooke B. (achieved in 2013 at age 11, plays for Mustang)

50 mph Kayla P. (achieved in 2012 at age 11, plays for Mustang)

50 mph Maile C. (achieved in 2013 at age 14, plays for Mustang)

50 mph Kelsey L. (achieved in 2012 at age 14, plays for Walnut Creek)

50 mph Nicole Z. (achieved in 2013 at age 13, plays for Pleasanton Rage)

52 mph Mackenzie B. (achieved in 2013 at age 12, plays for Mustang)

52 mph Lisette E. (achieved in 2012 at age 12, plays for Mustang)

52 mph Nick T. (achieved in 2012 at age 13, plays for Mustang)

52 mph Mikayla W. (achieved in 2012 at age 11, plays for San Ramon)

52 mph Paige M. (achieved in 2013 at age 12, plays for Mustang)

53 mph Mason T. (achieved in 2013 at age 11, plays for San Ramon)

55 mph Marshall H. (achieved in 2013 at age 11, plays for Walnut Creek)

55 mph Audrey W. (achieved in 2013 at age 15, plays for San Ramon)

57 mph Abigail O. (achieved in 2013 at age 15, plays for San Ramon)

58 mph Audrey C. (achieved in 2013 at age 13, plays for Mustang)

56 mph Bridget K. (achieved in 2013 at age 13, plays for San Ramon)

56 mph Amanda P. (achieved in 2013 at age 16, plays for Mustang)

56 mph Cassie B. (achieved in 2008 at age 12, plays for Castro Valley)

56 mph Erika P. (achieved in 2008 at age 12, plays for Mustang)

56 mph Jordan M. (achieved in 2012 at age 14, plays for Mustang)

56 mph Kylee H. (achieved in 2009 at age 12, plays for Mustang)

58 mph Rory B. (achieved in 2013 at age 12, plays for Mustang)

60 Club

60 mph Kamie L. (achieved in 2012 at age 15, plays for West Coast FC)

60 mph Morgan P. (achieved in 2012 at age 15, plays for Pleasanton Rage)

62 mph Kaitlyn L. (achieved in 2012 at age 16, plays for West Coast FC)

64 mph Emily P. (achieved in 2012 at age 15, plays for Pleasanton Rage)

64 mph Kylee H. (achieved in 2012 at age 15, plays for Mustang)

65 mph Pierce L. (achieved in 2012 at age 16, plays for Walnut Creek)

67 mph Cassie B. (achieved in 2012 at age 16, plays for Castro Valley)

68 mph Nathan H. (achieved in 2013 at age 14, plays for Walnut Creek)

Left Foot Milestones

45 mph Kayla P. (achieved in 2012 at age 11, plays for Mustang)

45 mph Maggie M. (achieved in 2012 at age 11, plays for Pleasanton Rage)

46 mph Mikayla W. (achieved in 2012 at age 11, plays for San Ramon)

48 mph Nick T. (achieved in 2012 at age 13, plays for Mustang)

49 mph Abigail O. (achieved in 2013 at age 15, plays for San Ramon)

50 mph Laine M. (achieved in 2012 at age 12, plays for Mustang)

50 mph Cassie B. (achieved in 2009 at age 13, plays for Pleasanton Rage)

52 mph Rory B. (achieved in 2013 at age 12, plays for Mustang)

55 mph Kylee H. (achieved in 2013 at age 15, plays for Mustang)

56 mph Samantha V. (achieved in 2012 at age 13, plays for Mustang)

60 mph Cassie B. (achieved in 2012 at age 16, plays for Pleasanton Rage)

Technical Skills

Technical Skills Are More Important Than Speed, Size, and Aggressiveness

As kids get older, Technical Skills are more important than speed, size, and aggressiveness. Speed and size are physical attributes that we have no control over. Yes, you can improve a player's running technique to improve his/her quickness and long distance speed. However, most players don't receive this type of technical training.

Children up to 9 years old can rely on their speed to dribble around players and score goals. If they are tall or big, they can bulldoze through or over players. If they are aggressive, they can intimidate opponents, so they can win the ball. The problem with fast, tall, big, and aggressive players is that they often lack technical skills (dribbling, passing, striking, shielding). These same players usually have average ball skills, dribble with their head down, cannot hold the ball very long, they tend to panic, make poor decisions, and usually cannot finish (score goals on a high percentage of their shots).

Lionel Messi who plays for FC Barcelona is the best player in the world, and he is one of the shortest players on the field at 5' 6". Sure he's really quick, but he also has exceptional technical ball skills. Technical skills takes focus, hard work, and a lot of practice (repetition/muscle memory).

If a player has problems finishing (scoring goals), then the way to improve this skill is to practice it a lot. If a player's shots on goal are weak, then get more repetition striking the ball with good technique.

Soccer is no different than any other sport. You can get by on your physical attributes for awhile, but if you want to play at the highest levels (college and/or professional) you must have excellent technical skills. The US Soccer Federation conducted a study of professional soccer players around the world, and they concluded that the average professional player spent at least 10,000 hours (in ten years) on soccer training, practice, and/or games. That breaks down to about 20 hours per week. If your child has practice 3 times per week and plays 2 games per week, he/she is spending less than 7 hours per week on soccer. You cannot become the best player you can be if you don't put in the time. 10,000 hours seems to be the common number of hours for professional players in other sports as well.

A few months ago I talked about the book called "The Talent Code" by Daniel Coyle. "This book is about a simple idea…..hotbeds are doing the same thing…..certain patterns of targeted practice build skill….a zone of accelerated learning that…..can be accessed by those who knew how. In short, they’ve cracked the talent code.

The talent code is built on revolutionary scientific discovery involving a neural insulator called myelin, which some neurologists now consider to be the holy grail of acquiring skill…..every human, whether they are playing baseball or playing Bach, is created by chains of nerve fibres carrying a tiny electrical impulse – basically, a signal traveling through a circuit. Myelin’s vital role is to wrap those nerve fibres the same way that rubber insulation wraps a copper wire, making the signal stronger and faster by preventing the electrical impulses from leaking out. When we fire our circuits the right way – when we practice swinging that bat or playing that note – our myelin responds by wrapping layers of insulation around that neural circuit, each new layer adding more skill and speed. The thicker the myelin gets, the better it insulates, and the faster and more accurate our movements and thoughts become. (Page 5)

Myelin is important for several reasons….everyone can grow it…..its growth enables all manner of skills, mental and physical….we can’t see it or feel it…..myelin is important because it provides us with a vivid new model for understanding skill. Skill is a cellular insulation that wraps neural circuits and that grows in response to certain signals. (Page 6)" Read the rest of this review at this link Book Review Of The Talent Code Daniel Coyle.html

Myelin can deteriorate too. Take a month off, and you have lost a lot of myelin (skill). Consistent training of the muscles is the way to maintain and improve technical skills.

A lot of the players I train have excellent technical striking skills. One 16 year old girl kicks the ball 67 miles per hour with her right foot & 60 mph with her left foot. Professional and college female players kick the ball between 55-65 mph. When she was 11 years old, she was only able to kick the ball 38 mph with her right foot and 24 mph with her left foot. She has perfect technical striking skills, and she trains with me every Sunday.

Another 16 year old player kicks the ball 65 mph with her right foot and 58 mph with her left foot. She already has a commitment letter to play for Cal Berkeley.

I have a ten year old girl who kicks the ball 51 mph with her right foot and 46 mph with her left. Most Division 1 or 3 13 year olds can't kick the ball this hard. She trains with me regularly. This player will play at a high level.

I have an 8 year old who plays as a goal keeper and as a field player. She can punt the ball so far that sometimes she comes close to scoring a goal. She trains with me 1-2 times per week.

Why spend time improving your children's technical skills? Because most coaches focus more on team tactics and restart plays. So unless you have the knowledge to teach your children technical soccer skills, you need my help.

Possession Soccer or Kick Ball?

Teams that do these things play a direct game (kick ball). Kick ball is not soccer:

1) On their first touch of the ball they kick it away instead of controlling the ball to keep possession.

2) They usually make 1-2 quick passes. Then they kick the ball up to the forwards/strikers.

3) The ball is kicked in the air a lot. The game looks ping pong. The soccer ball is kicked back and forth.

4) Their is a huge gap between the defenders/backs and the mid-fielders and forwards/strikers.

5) The backs/defenders rarely move up to the mid-field line when the team is in the attacking third of the field.

6) The backs/defenders never help on the attack to score goals.

7) They rarely pass the ball back to the goal keeper or backs/defenders.

8) They rarely switch the point of attack.

Teams that do these things play possession soccer (the way soccer is meant to be played):

1) On their first touch they either control the ball to open space or make a good pass to a teammate.

2) They usually connect 6+ passes before crossing the ball or taking a shot on goal.

3) The ball is played on the ground most of the game with precision passing (less air balls/long balls).

4) All players attack and defend as one unit leaving few gaps if any (especially in the middle of the field). They control the middle of the field.

5) The backs/defenders move pass the mid-field line often when the team is in the attacking third of the field.

6) The backs/defenders often help on the attack to score goals.

7) They often pass the ball to the goal keeper and backs/defenders.

8) They often switch the point of attack.

At Tryouts, how can I stand out against faster and more aggressive players?

1)     Improve your technical skills

2)     Improve your striking/kicking power and accuracy

3)     Improve your 1 v 1 skills

a.     Attacking – better dribbling skills to beat opponents, be creative, be unpredictable

b.    Defending – better defensive skills, not diving-in, delaying, be unpredictable, be patient, and forcing the opponent to either pass the ball or make a poor touch to lose possession (giving you the ball).

4)     Improve your 2 v 1 & 2 v 2 skills

a.     Attacking – moving off the ball (diagonal runs, overlapping runs, wall passes/give-n-go)

b.    Defending – working as a team, putting immediate pressure on the 1st attacker, marking the 2nd attacker tight, always staying goal side and ball side (pressure, cover, & balance tactics)

5)     Make better decisions on the field (knowing when to take shots on the goal, when to dribble, and when to pass the ball. Passing the ball too much means you have fewer chances to take shots, score goals, and stand out. Then you risk helping others stand out instead of you.

6)     Put yourself in the position to take more shots and score goals than your competition.

7)     Learn advanced technical skills to be more creative than your competition

If a team will have the same coach as last year, then players on last year’s D1 or D3 teams have an advantage. The coach(s) have seen them play all year. You will need to do everything to catch their eye. Here are some additional tips on how to stand out at the tryouts:

1)     Arrive to the tryouts early & warm up as close to the coaches as possible, so they know you arrived early

2)     Practice your dribbling moves & feints to show the coaches you know a lot of creative moves

3)     Don’t get caught up talking to friends/teammates. Coaches can see who is there to tryout and who is there to socialize

4)     Stay focused and follow the coach’s instructions

5)     Always be the first player back from  water breaks

6)     Wear something neon to stand out from the masses

7)     Finally, don’t set yourself up for failure by second guessing your abilities. Always stay positive and believe in yourself!!!

Which Training is Appropriate For Your Child?

Which training is appropriate for your child?

Suggested Training(s)

Frequency

My child lacks power in his/her kicks and/or kicks with the toes

Private Training, Small Group Training, and/or Elite Striker Training

1-2 trainings per week for 2 months, then once per week is recommended to maintain the skill

My child often kicks the ball over the goal and/or is not accurate when taking shots on goal

Private Training, Small Group Training, and/or Elite Striker Training

1-2 trainings per week for 2 months, then once per week is recommended to maintain the skill

My child has poor timing and accuracy with lofted balls

Elite Striker Training

Once per week

My child cannot kick or pass the ball with both right and left feet

Private Training, Small Group Training, and/or Elite Striker Training

1-2 trainings per week for 2 months, then once per week is recommended to maintain the skill

I want my child to take corner kicks, goal kicks, and/or score goals when taking direct/indirect kicks in games

Private Training, Small Group Training, and/or Elite Striker Training

1-2 trainings per week for 2 months, then once per week is recommended to maintain the skill

My child only uses his/her size and/or speed to beat opponents when dribbling the ball

Private Training, Small Group Training, and/or Elite Striker Training

1-2 trainings per week for 2 months, then once per week is recommended to maintain the skill

My child uses the same dribbling move. I want him/her to learn more feints and moves.

Private Training, Small Group Training, and/or Elite Striker Training

1-2 trainings per week for 2 months, then once per week is recommended to maintain the skill

My child has trouble dribbling around opponents

Private Training, Small Group Training, and/or Elite Striker Training

1 training per week for 2 months, then once per week is recommended to maintain the skill

My child has trouble defending opponents

Private Training, Small Group Training, and/or Elite Striker Training

1 training per week for 2 months, then once per week is recommended to maintain the skill

My child is not creative and too predictable when taking on opponents

Private Training, Small Group Training, and/or Elite Striker Training

1 training per week for 2 months, then once per week is recommended to maintain the skill

My child is not aggressive

Small Group Training and/or Elite Striker Training

1 training per week for 2 months, then once per week is recommended to maintain the skill

My child cannot hold the ball long

Private Training or Small Group Training

1 training per week for 2 months, then once per week is recommended to maintain the skill

My child takes too long to pass the ball or take shots on the goal

Small Group Training, Training for Midfielders & Strikers and/or Possession Soccer

1 training per week for 2 months, then once per week is recommended to maintain the skill

My child doesn't know when to dribble, when to pass, or when to take a shot on the goal

Small Group Training, Training for Midfielders & Strikers and/or Possession Soccer

1 training per week for 2 months, then once per week is recommended to maintain the skill

My child's coach plays my son/daughter as a back/fullback, so he/she just stands and rarely touches the ball. As a result, he/she just plays kick ball.

Small Group Training, Training for Midfielders & Strikers and/or Possession Soccer

1 training per week for 2 months, then once per week is recommended to maintain the skill

My child plays a completely different position this year, and he/she does not know what to do at his/her new position

Small Group Training, Training for Midfielders & Strikers and/or Possession Soccer

1 training per week for 2 months, then once per week is recommended to maintain the skill

My child is afraid to head the ball

Private Training or Small Group Training

1 training per week for 2 months, then once per week is recommended to maintain the skill

My child doesn't anticipate the play. Instead, he/she reacts to the play, so he/she is often out of position to help his/her team.

Small Group Training, Training for Midfielders & Strikers and/or Possession Soccer

1 training per week for 2 months, then once per week is recommended to maintain the skill

I want my child to stand out at the tryouts

Private Training, Small Group Training, Elite Striker Training, and/or Tryout Training

1-2 trainings per week for 2 months, then once per week is recommended to maintain the skill

I want my child to learn advanced technical skills to stand out and be more creative

Private Training, Small Group Training, Elite Striker Training, and/or Tryout Training

1-2 trainings per week for 2 months, then once per week is recommended to maintain the skill

Why should my child(ren) continue to work on his/her 1 v 1 & 2 v 2 attacking and defending skills through out the year?

Answer: Skills are lost if they are not maintained, and children will revert back to old habits. Also, coaches spend more time on team tactics than individual skills.

At school, children continue to learn English and Math through out the year. Fundamental skills in sports is no different.

Why should my child(ren) continue to work on his/her striking skills

Answer: Skills are lost if they are not maintained, and children will revert back to old habits. Also, coaches spend more time on team tactics than individual skills.

1 training per week is needed to maintain and improve striking skills. The better the striking skill, the more accurate and powerful the shots equals more goals.

Trainings/Clinics

Possession Soccer:

The goal is to teach players to make better decisions. Before a player receives the ball, he/she must ask these questions
a)
Can I shoot? (Can I take a shot on the goal?)
b)
Can I dribble? ( If I can't take a shot on goal, can I dribble and then take a shot on goal?)
c)
Can I pass? ( If I can't take a shot on goal, can I pass the ball to a teammate who is in better position to take a shot on goal?)

Answering those important questions will increase a child’s speed of play, allow them to make good decisions since they will know where to move the ball with their first touch, and increase their ability to anticipate and read the game. The team that keeps possession of the ball longer controls the tempo of the game and has more opportunities to score.

Why play possession soccer?
Most youth defenders don't get much practice dribbling, passing, and attacking will learn to play possession soccer. College coaches want complete soccer players and not players who just boot, kick, or clear the ball. Attacking players need practice switching the ball, playing the ball back or negative. Drawing opposing players away from their own goal creates more space for your team to attack with more players and have a better chance to score. Most of the top professional soccer teams play possession soccer. Watch Barcelona in this video using possession soccer to control the game, cause opposing players to chase the ball and get tired.

Watch them in this link

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I6A_K8oWqfk&feature=youtube_gdata_player

Curriculum:

1) Learn to relax and not panic when in possession of the ball. When players panic they play kick ball, dribble with their head down, and make poor decisions which usually results in turning over the ball

2) Learn to make the right decisions (know when to dribble, pass the ball to teammates, or take shots on goal)

3) Learn to improve 1st touch to open space which allows the player more time to look up, decide what to do next, see the field (including seeing the goal and goal keeper), see teammates, and see opponents

4) Learn to play the ball to the goal keeper and to backs/defenders to draw opponents to chase the ball and get tired

5) Learn to switch the point of attack to keep opponents chasing

6) Learn to play all positions except goal keeper

7) Backs/defenders will learn to attack as backs instead of just standing around waiting for the ball to come to their space

8) Learn to go wide & deep on the attack

9) Learn to create good passing lanes and angles
Contact Coach Quang at QLHamon@aol.com immediately if you are interested in participating in any of these programs.

 

Header Wars, Speed & Moves, Speed & Agility Training:

This NEW PROGRAM is great for players who need more practice heading the ball proficiently, fast players who rely too much on his/her speed to beat opponents, or for players who perform moves and feints but don't explode to space and collect the ball. Learn to beat opponents using quick and creative dribbling moves & feints and balls out-of-the air. Get lots of touches and practice on when to perform moves and how far away to perform them to increase the chance for success. Improve speed, knee, & ankle strength.

Goal Keeper Training (U9-U17):

2-on-1 ratio. Technical diving & catching, proper positioning in game situations (such as corner kicks, direct/indirect kicks, and penalty kicks), long distance punts and goal kicks. Goal keepers will learn to anticipate and read the game, so they will know when to stay on their goal line and when to come off of their line and pressure the 1st attacker. Goal keepers can come and participate in my Master Striker Trainings to get experience and get lots of touches saving shots on goal.

Elite Striker Sunday Trainings (U9-U18):

For D1/D3 players who want to maintain their skills, learn advanced technical and dribbling skills to be unpredictable when attacking, learn to be more creative, make better decisions on the field, learn advanced heading skills (“The Seal”), and develop power in both left and right feet. Striking the ball with the laces (not the toes), volley shots, & learning ways to appear more aggressive and physical. Also, learn to shield and hold the ball indefinitely and learn the proper ways to turn with the ball. Instead of turning into pressure/opponents, players will be taught several different feints & turns to use in different situations (with the back to opponent, when opponent is chasing, when opponent is to your side). Finally, learn to be the unpredictable and quick to recover when defending against an attacking player(s), and learn the art of winning the ball. Training schedule will begin in March.
Elite Striker Academy (U7-U8):

Ball Skills Mastery (technical dribbling, passing & receiving, & 1st touch), confidence to dribble with the head up, shield/hold the ball, 1 v 1 attacking and defending, 2 v 2 attacking and defending, learning to move off of the ball, and striking. This is the best training any 6 or 7 year old player can get to prepare to play on a U9 Competitive Level team next year. E-mail Coach Quang for training dates and times.

Tryout Training (U10-U17):

Sessions will continue to run mainly on Saturdays until the end of April for players preparing for tryouts (Mustang D3 U9-U14 & Mustang and Rage D1 U15-U18). Learn how to beat players and defend against fast and smart players during 1 v 1s, 2 v 2s, tips on how to stand out by talking more during tryouts, what to wear, how to warm up, what moves to use and when, and winning loose balls.

Bulldog Academy (U5-U6):

Ball skills, Ball skills, Ball skills. Learn dribbling moves, technical passing & receiving, shielding, and play lots of small sided games. Training schedule to follow soon.
Private Training:

Players to move from D3 to D1 and from Rec to D1/D3 need help improving technical skills, dribbling moves & feints, 1 v 1s, 2 v 2s, striking.

1-on-1

2-on-1

4-on-1

8-on-1

Team Training

Or create your own group size

For more information, e-mail Coach Quang Hamon at QLHamon@aol.com

STOP THE TOURNAMENTS

Too many games, little preparation and no training opportunities

By Jay Martin, Ph.D.

Tournaments, tournaments, tournaments. They are overwhelming youth soccer in this country. Everyone wants to play in tournaments. Soccer America has an entire issue devoted to tournaments. Every soccer publication in this country lists pages of tournaments for our children to attend! Every year the biggest decision a club team makes is "which tournaments do we attend?"

Tournaments are hurting America's soccer playing youth. Click here to read more

COACHING TIPS

Striking a ball (right footed kickers):

1)      Plant foot position (distance from the ball and position from the front and back of the ball.

2)      Bring your kicking leg as high as possible to ensure a lot of power.

3)      Keep your ankle locked.

4)      Your plant knee should be slightly bent.

5)      Lean slightly forward.

6)      Make sure your ankle is 45 degrees, so your laces will strike the ball and not your toe.

7)      Left arm out.

8)      Right arm by the side.

9)      Eyes on the ball.

10)  Watch your foot strike the ball.  Don’t look up.

11)  Kick through the ball not to the ball.

NUTRITION FAQ'S

Athletes need good nutrition to optimize their performance on the field. Therefore eating heavy greasy foods, such as donuts, hamburgers, fries, cheese, etc... within 3 hours of a soccer game can make players feel sick or sluggish. The body cannot efficiently supply enough energy to digest the greasy foods and for the body to run and play. Also, it important to hydrate the day before as well as before, during, and after the game. Below are some good articles on sports nutrition.

The Acid in oranges will upset your stomach

Parents should avoid giving orange slices to their children at half time. Grapes and melons are better on their tummies.

We have our pre-game meal at 2:30 or 3 p.m. and the game starts at 7:00 pm. Are we doing this right?

So far so good, but don't forget the pre-game snack about 2 hours before (around 5:00 p.m.). The snack should be about 250-350 calories, mostly carbohydrates, a little protein, and very little fat. A Power Bar, Boost, a bagel and jam, or cereal and skim milk are each good choices.

Depending on what time breakfast is, the athlete may also want to include a mid-morning snack. Too many athletes rely solely on the one pre-game meal to get them through competition. Optimally, the best fueled athlete is the one who has eaten small meals and snacks every few hours up to 1-1/2 to 2 hours before an event, with decreasing amounts of protein and fat the closer it gets to competition.

  • Click here for more nutrition tips from this source
  • Pre-Game Meals/Snacks: Pre-event nutrition can have a major effect on performance. Players diet should be HIGH IN CARBOHYDRATES, LOW IN FAT. The target is 60-70% carbohydrate, 10-15% protein. This is a very important meal as the main energy reserves are made up from the previous days meals, not from the pre-game meal or big breakfast of the competition day.

  • Click here for more nutrition tips from this source
  • SNACKS: Fruit Bars, Fig Newtons, Fruit (fresh or dried), Raisins, Apples, Banana, Saltines, Popcorn (no butter)

  • Click here for more nutrition tips from this source
  • Eat a Mix of Protein and Carbs after a game

    Though exercise is extremely beneficial, it does take a lot of effort on your body's part. After your workout, it's important to repair your muscles and replenish your glycogen stores for energy. Most experts recommend eating something within 90 minutes of finishing your workout, but sooner is better.

  • Click here for more nutrition tips from this source
  • Sports & Nutrition

    What you eat every day can have a big effect on how you perform. What you eat right before an event can be critical. Wrong choices can be disastrous. Right choices can give you that competitive edge.

  • Click here for more nutrition tips from this source
  • SHIN GUARD RASHES

    I recently had a player develop a heck of a case of shin guard rash and found a thread on the NC Soccer Forum that listed a number of possible remedies. Obviously if a rash persists you should see a doctor, but there were some very good suggestions from long time soccer parents and coaches about initial treatment, so I figured I’d share them.

  • Click here for more information on shin guard rashes
  • Our Mission Statement

    At Bulldog Soccer our goal is to help kids develop a love for the game of soccer, develop the skills necessary to succeed at whatever level the player wants to play at and learn valuable life lessons, such as good sportsmanship, the importance of teamwork, and having a positive attitude.  We strive to develop technically superior players who are well-rounded and confident, so they can reach their highest potential. We do this by using a comprehensive curriculum that focuses on fundamental, technical, tactical, & functional training.  Our team is dedicated to making your child’s soccer experience positive and fun.

    Our Equipment

    During trainings we use only the best state-of-the-art equipment to maximize results.

    • Radar Gun
    • This device helps players improve on striking power and technique.

    • Flex Goal
    • Get up to 30 kicks per minute with this rebound goal. That's 300 kicks in ten minutes or 1800 kicks in one hour.

    Premier Sponsors


    (925) 989-8086
    www.RickVillafuerte>>>>>>>Click here to visit this website


    (925) 324-7014
    E-mail april.balthaser@everbank.com
    390 Railroad Avenue, Suite 200, Danville, CA 94526
    www.everbank.com>>>>>>>Click here to visit this website


    (925) 789-0709
    E-mail info@activekidsdirectory.com
    PO Box 5158, Pleasanton CA 94566
    www.activekidsbayarea.com>>>>>>>Click here to visit this website


    (925) 838-9355
    185 Front St Ste 107, Danville CA 94526
    www.kennychiro.com>>>>>>>Click here to visit this website


    Velocity Sports Performance
    (925) 833-0100
    6270 Houston Pl # B, Dublin CA 94568
    www.velocitysp.com>>>>>>>Click here to visit this website


    www.dreyers.com>>>>>>>>>>>>Click here to visit this website


    www.jambajuice.com>>>>>>>>>>Click here to visit this website


    www.powerbar.com>>>>>>>>>>>Click here to visit this website


    925-227-1777
    4000 Pimlico Dr Ste 112, Pleasanton CA 94588
    www.quiznos.com>>>>>>>>>>>>Click here to visit this website


    Jenna Sawdon-Bea PT, PHD(C)
    Gina Villa, PTA
    (925) 556-4310
    7080 Donlon Way, Ste 108, Dublin CA 94568
    www.PersonalEdgePT.com>>>>>>>Click here to visit this website


    www.iinspect.com>>>>>>>>>>>>Click here to visit this website